justlooking

Recommend a battery tester

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Bored of second guessing whether a battery is nakard or simply “needs a run” alongside the worry of the dreaded post purchase phone call 2-3 days after buyer saying “car won’t start needs a new battery”...can anyone recommend a decent battery tester, you know, one like kwikfit or a proper garage would have, snap-on?

TIA

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Can’t rememver what brand ours is, it was circa £200 but it gives a printed receipt with test result as a percentage, I’ll check on Monday 

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Posted (edited)

Ive a sealey one seems do the job . Have a look in eBay had a look earlier seems to be some good ones at good value with printer etc 

Edited by Casper

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I use an old an school Sealey 25 quid drop tester, useful for starter motor voltage drop too. Still gives a quick n dirty idea. 

Some of these new batteries are like modern self adjusting clutches in that sometimes there no early warning signs......go, go, go, phut. 

Some cars give their own early 'my battery is croaking' hints, the strangest one is on FIAT Panda/Punto, the digital clocks reset every cold start - never a hot start when less demand -  everything else is fine:D

Always part of my PDI. 

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21 hours ago, justlooking said:

Bored of second guessing whether a battery is nakard or simply “needs a run” alongside the worry of the dreaded post purchase phone call 2-3 days after buyer saying “car won’t start needs a new battery”...can anyone recommend a decent battery tester, you know, one like kwikfit or a proper garage would have, snap-on?

TIA

For the last 9 years I've been using a multimeter which I bought for £10 quid. I can check the battery voltage and the alternator, as rule of thumb a charged battery should  hold between 12.6-12.9v. Then start the car and the voltage should be anything from 13.9v-14.4v which shows that the alternator charging system is working for my PDI. If your battery is below 12.6v its on its way out from my experience, you could try charing it over night (i use a Ring RCB320 workshop battery charger) and see if it brings it up to level, if it don't then get yourself a new battery. If your alternator is not getting you a minimum of 13.9v its on its way out so get that sorted before you flip the motor. Using the multimeter is cheap cost effective and gives me the confidence that the battery and charging system are good before its sold as like you I hate complaining whining customers post sale lol. If your up for forking out 100-200 quid you can get one which prints it out for you and it will save you some time in the testing part, personally i enjoy testing it with the multimeter lol cheap thrills i guess ;)

Anyways i hope this helps mate.

Cheers, Amer.

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Our in house Garage uses a dealer unit. Not cheap (about £120) but I can’t fault it 

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My setup exactly the same as AW. A £9.99 multimeter and a ring workshop battery charger. Easy and reliable.

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2 hours ago, AW MOTORGROUP said:

For the last 9 years I've been using a multimeter which I bought for £10 quid. I can check the battery voltage and the alternator, as rule of thumb a charged battery should  hold between 12.6-12.9v. Then start the car and the voltage should be anything from 13.9v-14.4v which shows that the alternator charging system is working for my PDI. If your battery is below 12.6v its on its way out from my experience, you could try charing it over night (i use a Ring RCB320 workshop battery charger) and see if it brings it up to level, if it don't then get yourself a new battery. If your alternator is not getting you a minimum of 13.9v its on its way out so get that sorted before you flip the motor. Using the multimeter is cheap cost effective and gives me the confidence that the battery and charging system are good before its sold as like you I hate complaining whining customers post sale lol. If your up for forking out 100-200 quid you can get one which prints it out for you and it will save you some time in the testing part, personally i enjoy testing it with the multimeter lol cheap thrills i guess ;)

Anyways i hope this helps mate.

Cheers, Amer.

This is a great detailed reply, however this is currently what I’m doing.

i am aware that even if the voltage is good, the battery can be duff? Dropped a cell? Not sure.

I’ll maintain what I’m/you’re doing then seek a more thorough tester as the chaps have suggested 

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this a great battery tester....

https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B01IOMEHLS/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Dead easy to use, and saves me from guessing the condition of a battery. When it tells you to replace the battery its never wrong. I bought it so I can check every car i buy so I dont get 'that call' from the customers. Has gone up on Amazon since i bought it on Amazon from 42 to 48 so not cheap, but this site has them cheaper....

http://www.obd2shop.co.uk/wholesale/foxwell-bt100-12v-car-battery-tester-for-flooded-agm-gel.html?gclid=Cj0KCQjwhJrqBRDZARIsALhp1WQfbk4CQaBBh19DdW8Pw6gqubDywgd9nL1T5Exj3N5KYUwKNRkL3E8aAgCHEALw_wcB

youtube has a few reviews if you put in foxwell bt100. The kind of tool that takes any guesswork out.

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Posted (edited)

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i have a proper drop tester but wont use it on modern batteries of any kind

its too easy to use one on a faulty battery that will explode before you realise the plates are bending

its best as already stated to give a suspect battery a trickle charge then load test it on the car

most of these so called battery testers are snake oils to sell mushers a battery

they need to be used with caution

just my two pennorth.

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2 hours ago, tradex said:

It's look good value to be fair .... 

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39 minutes ago, jason doyle motor sales said:

i have a proper drop tester but wont use it on modern batteries of any kind

its too easy to use one on a faulty battery that will explode before you realise the plates are bending

its best as already stated to give a suspect battery a trickle charge then load test it on the car

most of these so called battery testers are snake oils to sell mushers a battery

they need to be used with caution

just my two pennorth.

You've got my attention here.

Be grateful if you could explain why on those points B)

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2 hours ago, tradex said:

You've got my attention here.

Be grateful if you could explain why on those points B)

the cheap testers are literally a lot of hopefully copper wire wrapped round something

when you put it on a battery it is literally a full short,this is to simulate a full load being taken out of the battery aka to a cold start with cold oil

 

 

my old drop tester with 15 years of dust+

IMG_20190805_131731_hdr.jpg

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