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Lookers set to open doors to Teesside’s first Ford Store

Time 11:22 am, September 25, 2019

TEESSIDE motor retailer Middlesbrough Ford has announced the completion of a £3m expansion and renovation project, which has seen it transformed into Teesside’s very first cutting-edge Ford Store.

The site, which operates as part of the Lookers Group, has seen the size of its indoor new car display more than double from five to 11 vehicles.

The 3,500sq ft extension will bring the total size of the showroom up to 9,000 sq ft, with the adjacent 16,000 sq ft forecourt providing enough display space for 250 used cars and vans.


The changes include more than just the look of the site, with new general manager Ken Swindles joining the team.

Ken Swindles has moved to the Ford business from Lookers’ Renault/Nissan division, having spent the past two years working as general manager at its branch in Chester.

Ken joined Lookers having spent 14 years at Vauxhall Middlesbrough where he progressed through to general manager.

The new-look dealership, which can be found on Cargo Fleet Lane, also accommodates 165 customer parking bays, 22 workshop ramps and a Ford Approved bodyshop.


The Ford Store concept allows customers to browse the Ford range in a relaxed and informal environment, as well as learn more about each model through a series of intuitive interactive technologies.

The Middlesbrough Ford site was previously operated as part of the north-east-based Jennings group, which was acquired last year by Lookers.

Mr Swindles, pictured, said: ‘We are looking forward to seeing some familiar faces at our new Ford Store dealership, as well as attracting new customers from the surrounding area and beyond.’

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Dave Brown's avatar

Dave, production editor on Car Dealer Magazine, is a journalist with more than 30 years' experience in the worlds of newspapers, magazines and public relations.

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